Biojournal of Science and Technology (BJST)

A Scholarly Journal for Biological Publications

Biojournal of Science and Technology
Volume 1, ISSN:2410-9754, Article ID: m14001

Research Article

Association of Maternal Hypothyroidism with Preeclampsia in Bangladeshi population

Md. Bayejid Hosen, Hasan Al Banna, Yearul Kabir and M Zakir Hossain Howlader*

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000, Bangladesh.

Date of Acceptance: Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Date of Published: Saturday, October 18, 2014

Address corresponds to
M Zakir Hossain Howlader Ph.D.
Professor, Department of biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Dhaka, Dhaka – 1000, Bangladesh. Email: hhzakir@yahoo.com

Acedemic Editor: Dr M Hafizur Rahman

To cite this article
Md. Bayejid Hosen, Hasan Al Banna, Yearul Kabir and M Zakir Hossain Howlader*.Association of Maternal Hypothyroidism with Preeclampsia in Bangladeshi population.Biojournal of Science and Technology.Vol:1,2014

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ABSTRACT

Preeclampsia (PE) is a leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Our aim of the study was to evaluate the association of hypothyroidism with preeclampsia during pregnancy and after delivery. The study comprises a total of 52 subjects including PE women (n=27) and uncomplicated pregnant women (n=25) matched by age. The serum hormone levels were estimated by ELISA methods. The demographic data and hormone levels were analyzed using unpaired t test and pearson two tailed analysis was used for correlation. Over all, significantly decreased concentrations of total triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were observed in the preeclamptic group (p< 0.001; p< 0.01, respectively) compared with the normal pregnant group while the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly (p< 0.001) high. On the other hand, significant differences in T3 (p< 0.05) and T4 (p< 0.001) levels were found during pregnancy and after delivery among PE patients while TSH level non-significantly (p>0.05) increased. There were negative correlations of TSH with T3 (r=-0.16; p>0.05) and T4 (r=-0.11; p>0.05) observed though these were not statistically significant. Our findings suggested that hypothyroidism is associated with preeclampsia, and after delivery thyroid function become more deteriorated. Therefore, identification of thyroid abnormalities and appropriate measures might affect the occurrence and severity of the morbidity and mortality associated with preeclampsia.

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